Quick Glimpse 4: The PALISAL sawmill

Wednesday took us about an hour down the highway to the village of Yamaranguila and the PALISAL cooperative sawmill . 40 owner/members operate the mill, processing trees primarily from their own properties.

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The coop built a new structure in anticipation of our visit. It served as our training area and will continue to be used as a shop for construction of furniture and other items, using tools provided by generous Tools for Opportunity donors.

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Our students at the Colosuca school were in their teens and twenties. Here at PALISAL, we had older students, from their twenties on up. Because they were members of the coop, all had experience working machinery and construction of some sort. Our training introduced them to new tools and methods. One carpenter, Fausto (in the purple shirt, below), had spent a year in the US working construction and in our class stepped into a leadership role that kept the class moving at a brisk pace. Our first task was introducing them to the operation of a portable planer, used to smooth the faces of a board and bring it to a consistent thickness.

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However as we fed in the freshly milled lumber, the planer began to struggle to pull the boards through. Gene and I were puzzled. The carpenters persuaded us to use diesel fuel to clean the rollers and cutting knives, removing the pitch and sap that had built up on them, and as a result the planer operated like new (which is good, because it IS new!).

This incident also highlights an issue facing these carpenters. Woodworkers would prefer to have dried lumber to work with; about 10% moisture content is ideal. The wood used in Central America is freshly cut, which means a moisture content of 40% or even more. The wood will dry over time, but it shrinks and often twists as it does. Imagine what happens to a table or chair as wet wood dries. However, the carpenters can’t afford to buy lumber and then let it sit unused for several months while it dries before turning into something they can sell. We discussed the possibility of building solar kilns to help speed drying. This may be an area where Tools for Opportunity can provide assistance in the future.

Back in class, our carpenters absorbed lessons on the use of the Kreg Jig, router table, and table saw. In the photo below Jose Reyes, a skilled hand-tool carpenter, gets his first exposure to a new power tool, the router table. The second photo below shows some of Jose’s handmade molding planes he uses to accomplish the same type of work by hand. Again, plenty of talent here, ready to find new ways to be more productive.

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In the next glimpse, a wrap-up of our trip.

 

 

 

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